Some Notes on Wedding Hair

So it’s wedding season once again!

Don’t let wedding stress happen to you!

For hairstylists and brides alike this can be a stressful time so I’ve put together a list of things that can make all those hair interactions a little less crazed.

 

~8-12 weeks before the wedding: find a stylist and book the wedding date, your trial, possibly 2 trials, and map out color appointments and trims.

~4-6 weeks before the wedding: have your trial (with tiara, pins, veil, etc) and take final reference photos, make sure you have confirmed timing and number of people for services on day of.

~2-3 weeks before the wedding: do your color (if you normally color your hair) so that it has a little room to settle before the wedding, do your last trim before the wedding. Do NOT experiment with new color or cut this close to the wedding!

 

A few other notes:

-you want to look like yourself in photos, if you normally wear your hair a certain way use it as inspiration for your wedding hair, if you never wear it up in even a ponytail then maybe you don’t really want it all up for your wedding

-your hairstylist is likely to make more money at the salon than at your wedding so unless you’ve got the world’s biggest bridal party please bear in mind they are missing an entire 8 hour day to do 3 hours with you, often plus travel expenses, we love what we do, but please don’t assume tip is included in your total unless specifically stated

-typically it’s best for the bride to get her hair done second to last, you want to spend the morning “relaxing” as much as possible so make everyone else go first

-EXCEPT mother of the bride should be last, or in some cases the soon to be mother in law, these are people you want available to help run errands and be bullies to get things fixed, if they’re in a chair or already have their hair done they won’t be able to run around as much

What Every Hairstylist REALLY Wishes You Knew

The number one thing we all wish our clients understood is that we work on commission.

This means there is no hourly fee. We make only a percentage of the service charges. We make nothing for the time spent between clients, or when someone shows up late, or not at all, or cancels at the last minute.

Our prices reflect the time and products necessary to take care of you that day, as well as the time and money we’ve spent getting to our level of expertise, and marketing expenses to fill our chairs.

What this means for you as a client:
-No, we can’t do this service for less money with the same result. The quality will suffer if we have to sacrifice time or products.
-No, we don’t “live” on tips like servers do, but…
-Yes, tips do make up a large portion of the income we make.

Please respect our time and financial needs so we can take care of your hair the way we both want to.

Building Systems, Tips Four and Five

4– Have a no book list.

–Help your front desk learn how you want these clients addressed. There are clients you should stop doing. Create a plan for removing them from your schedule. Create a plan for recognizing “time suck” clients who you cannot please but for some reason keep coming back. You’ll feel better, and your days will run more smoothly and with fewer unforeseen delays.

5– Build a trust with your shampoo technicians and assistants.

–What can you do to teach them to do things the same way you do? If you can get them to follow the patterns you set then you won’t have as much work to do and you can take an extra client or two every day. That adds up.

Anyways, I hope that you guys can all get some of this rolling for yourselves, and spend some time building your own even bigger better systems for making yourself and your salons as efficient and awesome as possible.

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Building Systems

This article series is aimed at motivated stylists who are looking at their schedule and looking at their income and wondering why there’s a disconnect. If you’re a salon owner or manager looking at some of these you may find you need to get your team on board before you can fully utilize these techniques.

That “I feel really busy because I never seem to be able to get everyone in when they first want, but my paychecks don’t show me as having an increase from my past income” feeling is something many of us know all too well.

I’m here to give you 5 fast ideas for things you can do to increase your income by building effective time management systems. Put a system in place and always, I mean ALWAYS, follow it and you’ll see great results not only in your income but in overall client satisfaction as well.

Follow me over the next 4 days to get some tips. 🙂

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